MBC1887 T:ANE

Posted:

Updated:

January 1, 2017

January 8, 2017

Albert Canyon

Four miles west of Illecillewaet the valley narrows considerably and the Illecillewaet River flows through a narrow deep canyon. Albert Canyon, and the town site of the same name 2 miles further west, are named after Major A. B. Rogers nephew, Albert Rogers. Albert accompanied his uncle on the trek up the Illecillewaet River in the summer of 1881 that led to the discovery of Rogers Pass.

View of Albert Canyon cira 1886. Source: City of Vancouver Archives, Pubic Domain.

Click on image to enlarge/reduce.

Albert Canyon from below circa 1890. Source: City of Vancouver Archives, Pubic Domain.

Click on image to enlarge/reduce.

The narrowness of the canyon makes the depth perhaps look more than it actually is. A. O. Wheeler gives the following account of measuring the depth of the canyon in the 1905 report of his topographical surveys adjacent to the railway,.

 

“Before closing the survey I had occasion to again walk over this part of the road [Albert Canyon] and then climbed down and measured the drop with an aneroid barometer. A man was standing on the platform as I swung over and commenced to descend. “Don’t go down there, you’ll kill yourself sure!” he called out, and stood staring with a pained expression on his face, until I was again beside him. Upon being asked, “How far down do you think the water is?” he replied, ‘I don't know, at least a thousand feet!’ Both descent and ascent had given the same results, one hundred and forty-seven feet.”

 

The railway tracks curved around the southern edge of the precipice. The railway erected a platform above the chasm and passenger trains made a brief stop so that passengers could take in the wild beauty of the place.

Passengers viewing Albert Canyon circa 1890. Source: City of Vancouver Archives,

Pubic Domain.

Click on image to enlarge/reduce.

C.P.R. passenger train stopped at Albert Canyon  189_?. Source: City of Vancouver Archives, Pubic Domain.

Click on image to enlarge/reduce.

East bound C.P.R. passenger train on the MBC1887 route stopped at Albert Canyon lookout.

Click on image to enlarge/reduce.

East bound C.P.R. passenger train on the MBC1887 route stopped at Albert Canyon lookout.

Click on image to enlarge/reduce.

Reference:

 

The Selkirk Range. 1905. A. O. Wheeler, Ottawa Printing Bureau.